London Underground (Guide)

The London Underground, also known by its nickname as the Tube, or just the Underground, is a public rapid transit system type that serves the London region in England and some other parts of the nearest counties of Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, and Essex in the United Kingdom.

Information

More about London Underground (Guide)

London Underground (Guide)

The London Underground, also known by its nickname as the Tube, or just the Underground, is a public rapid transit system type that serves the London region in England and some other parts of the nearest counties of Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, and Essex in the United Kingdom.

Capacity

During the years 2017 and 2018, London Underground carried over 1.357 billion passengers, which make the Tube being the 12th-busiest metro system worldwide. The Tube has 11 lines, which handle up to 5 million passengers per day. The underground network has overal 270 stations and about 250 miles (400 km) of the track.

Interestingly, only 45% of the system is Underground in tunnels, and much of the network is available on the outer surface of London. Besides, the Underground does not cover most southern regions of London, and only 29 stations are accessible on the south of the River Thames.

The statistics of 2015 show 92% of operational expenditure, which is covered by passenger fares.

Facts

History

The initial idea of an underground railway connecting the City of London with its urban regions was proposed in the 1830s. Later, in 1854, the Metropolitan Railway was granted to build such a line, and soon they started to prepare construction. The first, short test tunnel was established in Kibblesworth, in the 1855s. The test-tunnel, which was in use for two years, was situated in a small town that had similar geological properties as London had.

The world's first underground railway, which opened in 1863, is situated between Paddington and Farringdon. The railway used gas-lit wooden carriages, which was hauled by steam locomotives. On an opening day, the rail carried around 38,000 passengers and borrowing trains from another railway system to enhance the service. This Underground is now part of the Hammersmith City, Circle, and Metropolitan lines.

Concerning the ticketing issues, in 1983, the first Travelcard ticket was introduced; Later in 2003, a new, contactless ticketing system emerged, known as Oyster. In 2014, people were provided with a new contactless card payment, that at the same time, made the Underground the first public transport system worldwide, which started to use contactless card payments.

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